Posts Tagged ‘love’

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Cast of Wonders 337: Silkstrand, A Minute Of


Silkstrand, A Minute Of

by Anton Stark

Imperial Majesty, Lord-for-Countless-Years, Son of Heaven, Ruler of Industry and Wisdom; this your servant Cai Jing of the Ministry of Works greets you. As per your Imperial Decree, I have compiled the following report on the matter of Master Su’s Clock and its abnormal behaviour. The facts of the case, as far as truth has presented itself, are as follows: (Continue Reading…)

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Cast of Wonders 335: Skinned


Skinned

by Amanda Helms

 

So Jian thinks he needs a new skin.

He says it like it’s no big deal, just a little epidermal clean-up, Oh ha ha how’d that peeling happen? But what he means is that he has to replace his rusting face. It’s harder to accept than a pinkie finger would be, or even a whole arm. His face is him, and Jian acts like tearing it off means nothing. (Continue Reading…)

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Cast of Wonders 289: Staff Picks 2017 – Blood and Water

Show Notes

Every year in January, Cast of Wonders takes the month off to recharge, plan the year ahead and highlight some of our favorite episodes. Throughout the month, different members of the Cast of Wonders crew will present their favorite story of 2017.

Our final Staff Picks episode for 2017 is hosted by editor Marguerite Kenner.


Blood and Water

by Jason Kimble

The year we turned nineteen, the boy I loved disappeared under the waves of Lake Michigan, but he didn’t die. I never told anyone. That he was alive. That I loved him. That he

My fingertip goes white as I smash down on the delete key and the cursor devours my words.

The broken swimming trophy lies sideways on the kitchen table. I stare at it as I dial, ignore the cat mewling, exiled, on the other side of the door. I count the rings of the phone at my ear. Seven rings (for the Dwarf-lords in their halls of stone) before Mr. Gravere picks up.

“Why are you calling, Mike?” Gravere says.

“It’s about a book,” I say. “I … think that I loaned it to Andy, before–”

“That wasn’t his name.” I can’t decide if the ice sheathing Mr. Gravere’s voice is better or worse than his scalding anger at the funeral.

“It’s special. A first edition. Return of the King. My mother–”

“So special it took you five years to notice it missing?”

“It’s just … ” I turn the gilded swimmer in my hand.

“I told you when he died, Michael: you’re not welcome here. Live without the book. I’m living without a whole lot more.” Mr. Gravere hangs up. (Continue Reading…)

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Cast of Wonders 266: The Immobile God of Secrets

Show Notes

Theme music “Appeal to Heavens” by Alexye Nov, available from Promo DJ or his Facebook page.


The Immobile God of Secrets

by Jamie Lackey

 

Jun slogged through the rice paddy, muddy water swirling around her calves.  She glanced behind her, checking again to make sure that Reiko and her cronies hadn’t chased her.  The only figure in sight was a lone scarecrow, wearing a pointed straw hat and a tattered blue yukata.

Its face, two wide eyes and a softly smiling line for its mouth, was painted onto a rough woven sack, and its wooden pole tilted slightly to the left.  It looked like it could bounce away at any second–Jun couldn’t imagine a single crow braving it.

She bowed.  “Thank you for your hospitality.”

“You are welcome anytime.”

Jun started back and almost fell.  She looked around again, but saw nothing but green stalks, heavy with yellowing rice, and the occasional glint of water.  She walked around the scarecrow.  Even the water was still–the only ripples were from her own passing.  She remembered her manners and bowed again.  “Thank you.”

“If you would stay and keep me company, I will share a secret with you.”

Jun’s socks were soggy and the sun was sinking in the west.  If she was late for dinner, her mother would worry.  But she liked secrets, and she’d never met a talking scarecrow before.  Jun knew that he must be a spirit, or a god, but he seemed kind.  And lonely.  Jun understood loneliness.  “I’ll stay.”

“Thank you.  Tell me, child, what brings you to my field?”

“There’s a girl at school who hates me.  I ran away from her.”

“You must have run very fast to find this place.”

“I am fast.  That’s why she hates me–she used to be the fastest girl on the track team.”

“Maybe she only chases you because she wants to catch up.”

Jun remembered rocks whistling past her ears, and the sting of a stone clipping her calf.  “I don’t think that’s the case.”

“Maybe not.”

“I don’t know why it bothers her so much.  She’s better than me in every other way.  She’s pretty and has tons of friends and is top in our class and her parents buy her anything she wants.”

“I will tell you her secret, if you wish to know it.”

Jun hoped she could use the secret to stop Reiko from tormenting her.  “I do.”

“Her parents do not love her, and she knows it.”

“But they’re her parents.”

“Yes.”

Jun frowned.  She didn’t want to feel sorry for Reiko.  “How do you know that?”

“I know many things,” the scarecrow said.

“Do you know about me?”

“Yes, I know everything about you, Shuuichi Jun.  You love pork cutlets and math class and running makes you feel free.  You want to take care of your mother and you worry about your grades, but have a hard time making yourself study.”

“How do you know all that?”

“That is my secret, child.”

“I need to get home–my mother will be worried.”

“Yes.  And she made you your favorite dinner.”

“Will I be able to come back?” Jun asked.

“The future is always uncertain.  But it would please me to see you again.”

Jun bowed again.  “Thank you for the secret.”  She walked back toward the path.  When she turned around, the paddy was empty.

 


 

Jun had no idea how to use the scarecrow’s secret.  She couldn’t imagine her parents not loving her.  Had Reiko done something horrible?  Or had they not wanted a daughter in the first place?  If they didn’t love her, why did they buy her so many presents?  It didn’t make sense.  Maybe the scarecrow had lied.

But Jun didn’t think so.  She couldn’t help but trust the scarecrow.

Reiko glared at her during track practice, just like she always did.  Then she and Reiko raced, just like they always did.  The coach believed they pushed each other.

Jun won, like she always did.  “Good race,” she said.

Reiko’s expression darkened.  “Don’t patronize me.”

Jun tried to keep her pity off of her face.

Reiko’s hands tightened into fists.  “What is up with you today?”

Jun shrugged.  “Why does it bother you so much?”

“Why does what bother me?”

“That I’m faster.”

“You bother me because you’re ugly and stupid.  I don’t care about track.  I’m only here because my father made me join a team.”

“Is he going to come to any of the meets?”

“Don’t talk to me, Shuuichi.”  Reiko snapped, then stormed off.

Reiko wasn’t waiting to torment Jun after practice, and she couldn’t find the path to the scarecrow’s rice paddy.

 


 

Jun stared down at her homework, but she’d read the poem a dozen times and it still didn’t make sense.  She padded out to the kitchen, where her mother was washing dishes.  “Mom, do you know anything about poetry?”

Her mom paused and pushed her dark hair away from her face with a soapy wrist.  “No, I’m sorry, sweetie.  Have you tried asking one of your classmates for help?”

“Good idea,” Jun said.  She went back to her room and flopped onto the floor.  She pulled her phone out of her pocket and stared at it for a long time.  Reiko was top of their class.  She probably understood poetry.  What would she do if Jun asked for help?

She’d probably laugh and call Jun stupid again.  Jun scrolled through her classmates’ phone numbers.  She wasn’t really friends with any of them.

Jun climbed out the window and ran.  The packed dirt path was hard against her bare feet.

The scarecrow’s rice paddy was different in the moonlight.  Silver and black and clearly magical.  Cold mud oozed between her toes.

“Hello,” Jun said, bowing.

“It is good to see you, but it is dangerous here at night,” the scarecrow said.

“What will Reiko do if I ask her for help?”

“I do not know what the future holds, child.  I only know the now.”

“Well, what do you think she’d do?”

“She might help you.  Or she might lash out.  She is not a happy girl.”

“Why don’t her parents love her?”

“Do you think she would want you to know that, when she herself doesn’t?”

“No.  I suppose not.”

“I will tell you something else, instead.”

“Okay.”

“There is a monster hiding by your path home.”

Chills ran along Jun’s skin.  “A monster?”

“Yes.  It is an angry spirit, hungry for human life.  It is strong, but you are fast.”

“What will happen if it catches me?”

“I do not know the future.”

“What does it normally do when it catches someone?”

“It eats them.”

“I’ll run as fast as I can, then.”

“Good.  I hope to see you again, child.  In the daytime.”

Jun sprinted down the dark path.  The moonlight cast deep shadows, and she imagined figures lurking in each one.  Her bare foot caught on a rock, and pain spiked through her.  She felt hot breath on her neck, but heard no sounds but the pounding of her own heart, the rhythm of her feet hitting the path, and the ragged cadence of her breath.

A shadow engulfed hers and spread before her on the path.  It was huge, with two tapered horns.

Jun pumped her arms faster.  Icy claws ripped through her hair and sliced the back of her left arm.

She saw a streetlight ahead and managed one last burst of speed.

The shadow faded, and she burst onto the road.  She collided with someone and tumbled to the ground.

Jun stared up at the sky and panted.  Blood dripped down her elbow.

“What’s wrong with you?”  Reiko loomed above her, scowling.  “Do you run everywhere?”

Jun blinked up at her.  “Would you help me with my poetry homework?”

Reiko rolled her eyes.  “No.”

Jun sat up and winced.  Her whole arm ached, and it felt like she’d plunged it into an icy river.

“Are you bleeding?”

Jun nodded.

“Are you okay?”

“I don’t know.  Could you–could you help me home?”

Reiko rolled her eyes again, but gave Jun her hand and pulled her to her feet.  “Just don’t bleed on me, okay?  This is a new top.”

The cold spread up Jun’s arm and to her chest.  She started to shiver.

Reiko pulled Jun’s good arm over her shoulder.  The contact was warm and comforting, even through Reiko’s new top.  “There’s something really wrong with you, isn’t there?”

“I–I’ll be okay.”  It was difficult to speak through her chattering teeth.

Her tiny house looked like an oasis of light and warmth as Reiko dragged her to the front door.  Jun saw her mother’s worried face, then darkness took her.

 


 

She woke tucked into her futon with a clean bandage around her arm.  A hot water bottle was nestled into the crook of her elbow, and another warmed her feet.  Her arm hurt, but she felt warm all through.

Her mother had dragged her own futon in and was sleeping beside her.  “Mom?”

“Oh, thank goodness.  Are you okay?”

“Yeah, I’m feeling much better.”

“What happened?  Why were you out without your shoes?”

“I went to visit a friend,” Jun said.

“The girl who brought you back?  She seemed very worried.  She offered to bring your schoolwork by today.”

“No, I met her on my way home.”

“Was it a boy?  Did he hurt you?  You can tell me sweetie, I promise I won’t be mad.”

“No.  I–I was running from a monster.”

“A monster.”

“I found a rice paddy with a scarecrow, and he could talk, because he’s really a god, and he told me secrets, but it’s dangerous at night and then there was an angry spirit–“

Her mother pressed the back of her hand to Jun’s forehead.  “Why don’t you lie back down.  I’ll make some tea.”

Her mother didn’t ask what happened again, but she brought a steady stream of hot drinks and made more pork cutlets for dinner.

Reiko arrived with a stack of books just before dinner.  “I’m so sorry,” she said, bowing.  “I didn’t think–“

“Come on in, dear!” Jun’s mother said.  “I was hoping you’d get here in time to eat with us.  I made enough for everyone–I wanted to thank you for getting Jun home last night.  That is if your own family won’t miss you–“

“They won’t,” Reiko said.  “Thank you, Mrs. Shuuichi.”

“I do hope you like pork cutlets.  They’re Jun’s favorite.”

“They’re mine, too.  Thank you.”

After dinner, Reiko followed Jun to her bedroom.  “I’ll help you with your poetry, but only if you tell me what happened last night.”

“What if I tell you and you don’t believe me?”

“I’ll believe you.”

“My mother doesn’t believe me.”

“You appeared out of nowhere, and there was… something behind you.”

“You saw it?”

She shrugged.  “I saw something.”

“When I was running from you the other day, I found a rice paddy with a scarecrow.  The scarecrow can talk, and he knows things.”

“A scarecrow that knows things?  Like Kuebiko–the god in the stories?”

“I think so, but I didn’t ask–I thought it might be rude.  Anyway, I went back there last night, and then that monster chased me.”

“It must have been a pretty fast monster.”

“I guess.”

“It probably would have caught me.”

“The scarecrow told me not to come back again after dark.”

“Why did you go at night, anyway?  And without your shoes?” Reiko asked.

“I had a question.”

“What could be so important that you ran off without your shoes?” Reiko asked.

Jun shrugged.

“Don’t tell me you went to ask Kuebiko about our stupid poetry homework.”

“No, that isn’t what I asked.”

“Was it about me?”

Jun looked down at the floor.  “Yes.”

“What did he tell you?”

“He told me that your parents don’t love you.”

Tears welled in Reiko’s eyes.  “Oh.  That.”

“I’m sorry,” Jun said.

“Did he tell you why?”

“No.”  Jun reached out and took Reiko’s hands between hers. “Do you want to ask him?”

Reiko blinked and two tears slipped down her cheeks.  “Yes.”

“Let’s go tomorrow, right after school.”

“Okay.”

 


 

“We can only find the path if we run,” Jun said.  “Sometimes, I can’t find it at all.  Stay as close to me as you can.”

“Don’t push yourself too hard,” Reiko said.  “You’re still recovering, and I don’t want to have to carry you again.”

“Let’s go.”

They ran.  The path opened up under her feet, and she splashed into the rice paddy with Reiko close behind.

“Hello, children.”

Jun bowed.

“The scarecrow really can talk,” Reiko said.

“I can.”  It sounded amused.

“Go ahead, ask your question,” Jun said.  “I won’t listen.”

She turned away and covered her ears.

After a while, Reiko tapped her shoulder.  Her eyes were red.  “I’m done.”

“Are you okay?” Jun asked.

Reiko shrugged.  “Thank you for bringing me here.”

“You’re welcome.”

“I’m sorry I was such a jerk to you.”

“It’s okay.”

“I didn’t mean to hit you with that rock.  We were trying to miss.  I won’t do anything like that again, I promise.”

“Yeah?  Okay.”

“I can keep helping you with your homework, if you want.”

“I’d like that.”

“It is safe to walk down the path now,” the scarecrow said.  “Your mother is finishing up your dinner.”

“Thank you.  We’ll be going.” Jun asked.

“Can we come back?” Reiko asked.

“I do not know what the future holds,” the scarecrow said.  “But I will never shut you out.”

“What is her mother making for dinner?” Reiko asked.

“A hot pot.”

“Is there enough for me?”

“Of course.”

Reiko grinned.  “Awesome.  Let’s go.”

They walked down the path together, then Jun stopped.  “Wait for me here just sec, okay?”

“Sure.”

Jun ran back up to the rice paddy and splashed out to the scarecrow.  “Did you plan all this?  Or did it just happen?”

The scarecrow chuckled.  “How can I control anything?  I cannot move from this spot.”

“Well, I just wanted to say thank you.”

“You are welcome, Shuuichi Jun.  You deserve to be happy.”

“And Reiko does too, right?”

“You’ve already answered that question.”

Jun bowed, then ran back to her friend.

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Cast of Wonders 258: Victory Music

Show Notes

Mermaid UK: http://www.mermaidsuk.org.uk
The Trevor Project: http://www.thetrevorproject.org/

Theme music “Appeal to Heavens” by Alexye Nov, available from Promo DJ or his Facebook page.


Victory Music

by Daniel José Older

One of my favorite moments ever was when the boy called me an Arab and you said, “She’s Sikh, fucknut” and then when he said “Oh, like hide and go-“ you broke his nose. I heard music playing, I swear to God, and it was victory music, your music: A dusty, unflinching beat, lowdown and grinding. It didn’t matter that my family’s not even technically Sikh anymore since my parents went born-again and I’m just whatever. I smiled for days after that moment, Krys. Days.

(Continue Reading…)

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Episode 250: Blood and Water by Jason Kimble


Blood and Water

by Jason Kimble

The year we turned nineteen, the boy I loved disappeared under the waves of Lake Michigan, but he didn’t die. I never told anyone. That he was alive. That I loved him. That he

My fingertip goes white as I smash down on the delete key and the cursor devours my words.

The broken swimming trophy lies sideways on the kitchen table. I stare at it as I dial, ignore the cat mewling, exiled, on the other side of the door. I count the rings of the phone at my ear. Seven rings (for the Dwarf-lords in their halls of stone) before Mr. Gravere picks up.

“Why are you calling, Mike?” Gravere says.

“It’s about a book,” I say. “I … think that I loaned it to Andy, before–”

“That wasn’t his name.” I can’t decide if the ice sheathing Mr. Gravere’s voice is better or worse than his scalding anger at the funeral.

“It’s special. A first edition. Return of the King. My mother–”

“So special it took you five years to notice it missing?”

“It’s just … ” I turn the gilded swimmer in my hand.

“I told you when he died, Michael: you’re not welcome here. Live without the book. I’m living without a whole lot more.” Mr. Gravere hangs up. (Continue Reading…)

Episode 237: Little Wonders 10 – Flash Fiction Contest Winners

Show Notes

 

The Little Wonders theme, “Neversus” is by Alexye Nov, available from Promo DJ or his Facebook page.


More Than Machines Will Fall to Rust

by Rachael K. Jones

I’ll tell it like it never happened, Patrick. Like we were childhood besties swapping knock-knock jokes from the tip-top branches of our favorite climbing tree. That we donned towel capes and played at superheroes, that we took turns being sidekicks so nobody had to play the villain. That it went on like that forever. That we never entered the science fair, and my experiment with exothermic reaction never beat out your atomic clock. That you didn’t resent losing to a girl, because I was your best friend, and it shouldn’t have mattered.

And when The Agency recruited me young on the strength of my scientific promise, and I really got the cape and powers and sidekick, you withdrew into a mechanical exile of your own choosing, all wires and servos and circuit boards.

(Continue Reading…)

Episode 209: A Real Stand-Up Guy by Daniel and Mary E. Lowd


• Narrated by Mat Weller
• Audio production by Jeremy Carter
• Originally appeared in Allasso (Volume 3)
• Discuss this story on our forum
• For a list of all our stories, authors and narrators, visit our Wikia page
• Come visit us on Facebook and Twitter


Listen above or download here.

Show Notes

Mary E. Lowd is a science fiction and furry author; her husband Daniel Lowd is a computer science professor. You can learn more about Mary’s writing online. The sequel to this story, the novella When a Cat Loves a Dog, won an Ursa Major Award!

Mat WellerMat Weller is the servant to a lovely family in eastern Pennsylvania. After his wife and kids go to sleep at night, he sometimes re-watches old episodes of X-Files on Netflix and other times retires to his basement booth where he records noises that get played on the Internet. Rumor has it he also makes delightful chocolate chip cookies. Learn more by following him online or on Twitter.

 

 

 


Theme music is “Appeal to Heavens” by Alexye Nov, available at MusicAlley.com.

Read along with the text of the story.

Episode 198: The Authorized Biography (Part 2) by Michael G. Ryan


• Narrated by Brian Rollins
• Audio production by Rikki La Coste
• A Cast of Wonders original!
• Discuss this story on our forum
• For a list of all our stories, authors and narrators, visit our Wikia page
• Come visit us on Facebook and Twitter

 

Listen above or download here.

Show Notes

This week we present the conclusion of The Authorized Biography by Michael G. Ryan, narrated by Brian Rollins. We provided Michael and Brian’s full biographies last week.


Theme music is “Appeal to Heavens” by Alexye Nov, available at MusicAlley.com.

Read along with the text of the story.

Episode 197: The Authorized Biography (Part 1) by Michael G. Ryan


• Narrated by Brian Rollins
• Audio production by Rikki La Coste
• A Cast of Wonders original!
• Discuss this story on our forum
• For a list of all our stories, authors and narrators, visit our Wikia page
• Come visit us on Facebook and Twitter

 

Listen above or download here.

Show Notes

Michael G. RyanWe present this week part one of The Authorized Biography by Michael G. Ryan. Michael considers himself a late bloomer as a published author–but not as a writer. He’s been writing for over 40 years, but is only now taking all those short stories and novels out of the digital bottom drawer and submitting them for consideration.

He’s planning a Kickstarter in early 2016 for his novel None of This Has Happened Yet, a fictional biography told in short stories presented in reverse order. He’s been an editor in the gaming industry for twenty years, working now as the director of publications for Privateer Press.

Brian RollinsThe story is narrated by Brian Rollins. Brian is a voice actor living in the Denver, Colorado area with his wife, two kids and a Great Dane. He has narrated for a variety of podcasts as well as several audiobooks, including the Glen & Tyler series. When he’s not in the soundbooth, he works as a web developer and can occasionally be coaxed out into public and onto the stage (usually with Dr. Pepper or chocolate). You can find Brian online and on Twitter.

 

 


Galen Dara’s amazing print for Artemis Rising is available on Society6.


Theme music is “Appeal to Heavens” by Alexye Nov, available at MusicAlley.com.

Read along with the text of the story.

Episode 150: Little Wonders 7 – The Season of Goodwill


Authors: Emmalia Harrington and Jamie Lackey
Narrators: Anne Fortune and Marguerite Kenner

Listen above or download here.

Show Notes

You’re listening to Little Wonders, our thematic flash fiction collections. This week we bring you our final episode for 2014, and lucky number 150 – a pair of stories for the inspired by the Season of Goodwill.


Our first offering is The Secret Ingredient Is by Emmalia Harrington. Emmalia is a writer and librarian who is making her first forays into publishing fiction. She adores fantasy, science fiction and other speculative works, as well as historical fiction and non-fiction. When she isn’t writing, she’s sewing, knitting, cooking or otherwise trying to keep her hands busy.

The story is served up for you by Anne-Louise Fortune, an actor and performer from Manchester. She also finds time to write scripts and the occasional audio drama, and yes, fanfic, as well as taking photographs at ‘geek events’ for Starburst Magazine. On Sundays Anne can be found being the eternally exasperated ‘Producer Al’ for The Bookworm podcast, a part of Fab Radio International. You can also find her on Twitter and follow her adventures as she conquers her fear of heights by learning aerial acrobatics!


Speaking of cozy, our second story is Jamie Lackey’s Christmas Lights. Jamie lives in Pittsburgh with her husband and cat. Her fiction has appeared in Daily Science Fiction, Beneath Ceaseless Skies, and the Stoker Award-winning After Death… She’s a member of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. Her short story collection, One Revolution, is available on Amazon. She’s currently editing the anthology Triangulation: Lost Voices, which is open for submissions through the end of February.

We’ll have links to her Facebook page, website and Twitter in the show notes.


Theme music is “Neversus” by Alexye Nov, available at MusicAlley.com.

Read Along

The Secret Ingredient Is: Click here to read the text of the story

Christmas Lights: Click here to read the text of the story